Author Archives: msylvain

SciFi Book Club to discuss A Night in the Lonesome October

The SciFi Book Club is reading A Night in the Lonesome October by Roger Zelazny for our October meeting. Nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1994, this was the author’s final work before his death in 1995. Zelanzy, author of poetry and prose, has an impressive bibliography for his short 58 years. He’s been cited as an influence of several important contemporary authors such as Neil Gaiman and George R.R. Martin.

Taking place from the perspective of a dog, the reader is introduced to familiar and not so familiar characters (with their animal familiars) as some try to open a portal to let the Elder Gods in to Earth and others try to keep the portal closed. Let’s just say if you’re a fan of H.P. Lovecraft, you should read this. With each chapter (plus an introduction) representing one day of October and a storyline that mixes the supernatural with horror and humor, we felt this was a fitting choice for October.

The book also includes illustrations by Gahan Wilson, a celebrated cartoonist known for his dark humor. You can find a sample of some of his work on his official website.

The Claire T. Carney Library has one copy of this book on 7 day reserve (and many of Zelazny’s other books), but you can also look at your public library or use our interlibrary loan service to get your hands on this one.

We look forward to seeing you at our meeting on Tuesday, October 31st at 2pm in Library 314. Halloween costumes are welcome!

Banned Books Week – Celebrating the Freedom to Read

Banned Books Week is an annual awareness campaign promoted by the American Library Association and Amnesty International, to be held the week of September 24th in 2017. It celebrates the freedom to read, draws attention to banned and challenged books, and highlights persecuted individuals.

Every year the coalition of organizations that sponsors Banned Books Week has featured specific categories of banned and challenged books. This year’s celebration will emphasize the importance of the First Amendment, which guarantees our inherent right to read, naming the theme “Our Right to Read.”

The library is displaying selected banned books on the 1st floor near the Circulation Desk.  So, exercise your First Amendment right by checking out a banned book and reading it!

Writer’s Guide to Government Information – A New Library Blog

Attention Aspiring (and Accomplished) Writers! We want to let you know about a new library blog, one that is unique and managed by our Undergraduate and User Services Librarian, Kari Mofford. It is called the “Writer’s Guide to Government Information Sources to Inject Real Life Detail into Your Fiction.” Here’s Kari’s description:

“I recently became the new owner/author of the blog, “Writer’s Guide to Government Information Sources to Inject Real Life Detail into Your Fiction.” Over the summer I’ve been editing, link checking, and reading through all the posts to better understand the original author’s vision. Daniel Cornwall, previously a Government Document Librarian, created an amazing reference work in blog format for assisting fiction writers/editors with fact checking and adding realism to stories. His idea was to only use Government web sites, which is very interesting. Not being a Gov. Docs. Librarian, I am learning so much about these resources and how useful they are! After my initial work, I will be adding entries and working on some larger organization/metadata issues.

I loved this blog from first read…as an avid fiction reader, I agree, nothing takes you out of a story faster than facts that are not even close.

That said, I would love to have your feedback and if you have classes or students with creative writing projects, I would enjoy their perspective of what would be helpful for future posts and topics.

While this is made for writers, everyone can enjoy reading this and It serves as a wonderful reference work. “

Here are some posts:

https://writersguidetogovinfo.wordpress.com/category/what-if-your-story-isnt-set-on-earth/
https://writersguidetogovinfo.wordpress.com/tag/military-medicine/
https://writersguidetogovinfo.wordpress.com/tag/allergies/
https://writersguidetogovinfo.wordpress.com/category/flora-and-fauna/

Questions/Comments/Feedback? Please contact Kari at: kmofford@umassd.edu

Browse and Monitor Journals with BrowZine Web

Browzine LogoUMassD Library Services announces the availability of BrowZine web! This makes browsing and monitoring academic journals even easier. Create virtual bookshelves of your favorite journals and sync them between BrowZine Web and your iOS or Android device.

BrowZine includes many, but not all, of the library’s scholarly journals. Review a list of participating publishers.

Check it out and let us know what you think.

An Example of a BrowZine Table of Contents:

Browzine Web Screenshot

SciFi Book Club Mtg 8/22 – The Golden Compass

Golden Compass art work

Chapter 18 – Fog and Ice,
by Philip Pullman, Source

For the final (and, unintentionally, the second) Sci Fi Book Club meeting of the summer, we’ll be discussing Philip Pullman’s The Golden Compass. Known in the UK and Australia as Northern Lights, The Golden Compass is the first book in Pullman’s His Dark Materials series. It was released in 1995 and won the Carnegie Medal for Children’s Fiction in the UK that same year. The Golden Compass/His Dark Materials has been adapted to a variety of mediums, some listed here (be sure to scroll down all the way!). There are plans also in place for the BBC to make a TV adaptation of the entire series, though not much has been discussed about it recently.

If you haven’t read the series already, perhaps you’ve seen the movie or at least heard about the controversy. A movie version of The Golden Compass was released in 2007 and many religious organizations spoke out against it. The trilogy itself is no stranger to controversy, as in 2008 it was number 2 on the American Library Association’s Top Ten Challenged Books list.

Other than in this blog post and at the Sci Fi Book Club meeting, you’ll likely be hearing more about this series soon. Pullman is releasing the first book in what he calls the “equal” series entitled The Book of Dust. In May he released a preview of the book in The Guardian, but be wary of spoilers if you haven’t finished The Golden Compass or perhaps the whole series. You’ll likely hear more folks talk about these books in the coming years, so here’s your warning.

We look forward to seeing you in Library 314 at 1pm on Tuesday, August 22nd to discuss The Golden Compass. Since our American Gods meeting was canceled, we’ll plan on taking some time to discuss it as well. If you’ve only read one or part of either of the books, still feel free to join us!

Dean Burton – Selected as a Distinguished Alumni of UWM’s School of Information Studies

Terry Burton

Congratulations to Dean Burton for being selected as one of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Information Studies 50 Distinguished Alumni!  The school selected recipients “who, through their lives and work, exemplify the breadth, diversity, culture, and spirit of the School of Information Studies and its research, academics, practice and community engagement.”

Dean Burton received his Master of Library and Information Science degree from the Univ. of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 1988. He joined UMass Dartmouth as Dean of Library Services in 2010 after serving as the Director of the Health Sciences Library at West Virginia University and at the University of Wisconsin Madison. He has approximately twenty years of administrative experience, leading libraries during a period of historic transformation. His tenure at UMassD has included an award-winning building renovation, an expansion of library services, and management of significant staffing and position changes.  

Thanks to the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee for recognizing Dean Burton’s considerable accomplishments!