Author Archives: msylvain

Using FastCase and HeinOnline for Legal Research

Are you doing caselaw or legal research, but confused on how to get started? Not sure if you have all the tools you need, or if there are accessible alternatives to Google Scholar or the Cornell LLI? If you’re researching these topics, you need to know about our library subscriptions to HeinOnline and FastCase.

FastCase provides access to federal and state case law, statutes, regulations, court rules, constitutions, and connects with HeinOnline to provide law review articles. Its search abilities and added tools are like the functions you’d find in other legal research platforms, and FastCase has the added benefit of being one of the most widely used tools for legal research thanks to many State Bar Associations providing it to lawyers (including Massachusetts).

HeinOnline is a database covering legal history, government documents and reports, legal reviews, and international law. The integration of HeinOnline with FastCase also allows you to quickly find the case law or court decision cited in a law journal or other legal classic. Together, these two platforms should cover your most of your legal research needs!

If you’d like to know more about how to use these powerful tools, contact your librarian liaison.

 

Position Opening: Web and Discovery Services Librarian

We are looking for a service-oriented librarian to develop and enhance our library user interfaces. This includes the library’s website and blog as well as our Primo discovery service. The Web and Discovery Services Librarian will be part of a creative and forward-looking team and will participate in a variety of new library initiatives. This librarian will lead the library’s usability efforts and will adapt new and existing web tools to improve the library’s online platforms and interfaces.  This position offers the potential for a librarian to grow and develop in the areas of web interface development and library systems.

Read the job description and apply at http://bit.ly/2Aob15y 

 

YouTube Channel for UMass Dartmouth Library Services

UMass Dartmouth Library YouTube Channel

You do research in all kinds of places—work, school, home, coffee shops—and at all times of the day, including late at night. Wouldn’t it be great if you could get help wherever and whenever you needed it?

Now you can! The UMass Dartmouth Library recently launched a YouTube channel chock-full of short videos to help you with common research questions. No librarian on duty at 2am? No problem!

The Library’s playlists include:

Locating or Requesting Full-Text Articles: Did you find a citation you like but can’t figure out how to get the article? This playlist will show you how to get from citation to full-text article.

EBSCO Databases: Most videos are a minute or less, and cover topics like limiting and sorting search results, emailing articles, and getting article citations. These are applicable in dozens of databases, including Business Source Complete, CINAHL, Criminal Justice Abstracts, MLA International Bibliography, PsycINFO, and SocINDEX.

There are also videos geared toward those studying specific disciplines, like nursing and psychology. More videos will be added throughout the year, so be sure to subscribe to the Library’s YouTube channel!

SciFi Book Club to discuss A Night in the Lonesome October

The SciFi Book Club is reading A Night in the Lonesome October by Roger Zelazny for our October meeting. Nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1994, this was the author’s final work before his death in 1995. Zelanzy, author of poetry and prose, has an impressive bibliography for his short 58 years. He’s been cited as an influence of several important contemporary authors such as Neil Gaiman and George R.R. Martin.

Taking place from the perspective of a dog, the reader is introduced to familiar and not so familiar characters (with their animal familiars) as some try to open a portal to let the Elder Gods in to Earth and others try to keep the portal closed. Let’s just say if you’re a fan of H.P. Lovecraft, you should read this. With each chapter (plus an introduction) representing one day of October and a storyline that mixes the supernatural with horror and humor, we felt this was a fitting choice for October.

The book also includes illustrations by Gahan Wilson, a celebrated cartoonist known for his dark humor. You can find a sample of some of his work on his official website.

The Claire T. Carney Library has one copy of this book on 7 day reserve (and many of Zelazny’s other books), but you can also look at your public library or use our interlibrary loan service to get your hands on this one.

We look forward to seeing you at our meeting on Tuesday, October 31st at 2pm in Library 314. Halloween costumes are welcome!

Banned Books Week – Celebrating the Freedom to Read

Banned Books Week is an annual awareness campaign promoted by the American Library Association and Amnesty International, to be held the week of September 24th in 2017. It celebrates the freedom to read, draws attention to banned and challenged books, and highlights persecuted individuals.

Every year the coalition of organizations that sponsors Banned Books Week has featured specific categories of banned and challenged books. This year’s celebration will emphasize the importance of the First Amendment, which guarantees our inherent right to read, naming the theme “Our Right to Read.”

The library is displaying selected banned books on the 1st floor near the Circulation Desk.  So, exercise your First Amendment right by checking out a banned book and reading it!

Writer’s Guide to Government Information – A New Library Blog

Attention Aspiring (and Accomplished) Writers! We want to let you know about a new library blog, one that is unique and managed by our Undergraduate and User Services Librarian, Kari Mofford. It is called the “Writer’s Guide to Government Information Sources to Inject Real Life Detail into Your Fiction.” Here’s Kari’s description:

“I recently became the new owner/author of the blog, “Writer’s Guide to Government Information Sources to Inject Real Life Detail into Your Fiction.” Over the summer I’ve been editing, link checking, and reading through all the posts to better understand the original author’s vision. Daniel Cornwall, previously a Government Document Librarian, created an amazing reference work in blog format for assisting fiction writers/editors with fact checking and adding realism to stories. His idea was to only use Government web sites, which is very interesting. Not being a Gov. Docs. Librarian, I am learning so much about these resources and how useful they are! After my initial work, I will be adding entries and working on some larger organization/metadata issues.

I loved this blog from first read…as an avid fiction reader, I agree, nothing takes you out of a story faster than facts that are not even close.

That said, I would love to have your feedback and if you have classes or students with creative writing projects, I would enjoy their perspective of what would be helpful for future posts and topics.

While this is made for writers, everyone can enjoy reading this and It serves as a wonderful reference work. “

Here are some posts:

https://writersguidetogovinfo.wordpress.com/category/what-if-your-story-isnt-set-on-earth/
https://writersguidetogovinfo.wordpress.com/tag/military-medicine/
https://writersguidetogovinfo.wordpress.com/tag/allergies/
https://writersguidetogovinfo.wordpress.com/category/flora-and-fauna/

Questions/Comments/Feedback? Please contact Kari at: kmofford@umassd.edu