Category Archives: General Library

Announcing the New Issue of PLCS: Transnational Africas: Visual, Material and Sonic Cultures of Lusophone Africa

We are pleased to announce that Portuguese Literary & Cultural Studies (PLCS) 30/31, Transnational Africas: Visual, Material and Sonic Cultures of Lusophone Africa, is now available.  You can find this issue as well as all back issues available for free on the journal’s website!Image of the cover of PLCS 30/31. The cover shows a stucco doorway with water views.

Portuguese Literary & Cultural Studies (PLCS) is an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed hybrid online and print journal that publishes original research related to the literatures and cultures of the diverse communities of the Portuguese-speaking world from a broad range of academic, critical and theoretical approaches. PLCS is published semi-annually by Tagus Press in the Center for Portuguese Studies and Culture at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.

The Center for Portuguese Studies and Cultures ‘s Tagus Press publishes its electronic version of Portuguese Literary & Cultural Studies (PLCS) on the library’s journal hosting platform.

SciFi Book Club to discuss “Cinder” by Marissa Meyer

The Science Fiction Book Club is taking a summer detour from our typical reads for something a little different: Cinderella stories! The first book on our list is Cinder by Marissa Meyer.

In this version, Cinderella is a 16-year-old cyborg who works as a mechanic. Earth is on the brink of war with the moon and an incurable disease is running rampant. As you can already tell, this has a little more science fiction than most Cinderella retellings. We felt this would be a great book to transition to a slightly different genre for the season.

Meyer started the book as part of NaNoWriMo in 2008, wrote the first draft in two weeks and slowly perfected it over the course of two years before sending it to a publisher. Not only is Meyer’s academic background in creative writing and publishing, but she also spent a decade writing fanfiction. You can say her entire life has been preparing her to write fairy tale retellings! Cinder is the first of four books (not to mention other works in the same universe) in The Lunar Chronicles, with each of the books being retellings of other fairy tale heroines that all fit into one overarching storyline.

You can find it (and the other books in the series) at your local public library or through interlibrary loan.

We look forward to chatting with you about Cinder on Wednesday, June 20th at 12:00pm in Library 314.

Position Opening: Social Sciences and Data Services Librarian

UMass Dartmouth welcomes applications for the position of Information Services Librarian for the Social Sciences and Data Services. This librarian will deliver reference and instruction services in conjunction with a team of Information Services librarians, consult with and inform researchers in all departments of the university on practices and opportunities for data management, and develop professional relationships with faculty and students in multiple College of Arts and Sciences departments to assess and respond to research, teaching, and learning needs. Information Services librarians also participate in information literacy instruction for first-year English classes. General responsibilities include participation in assessment of services, collection development, instruction and related activities, as well as other division, library, university, and professional activities, projects, and organizations, as appropriate.  Minimum starting salaries: Assistant Librarian $55,330/Associate Librarian $64,796. The review of applications will begin June 11, 2018 and continue until the position is filled.

For full details of the position, please view our ad here: http://careers.umassd.edu/dartmouth/en-us/job/494119/assistantassociate-librarian-social-sciences-and-data-services

The Claire T. Carney Library is located on the campus of UMass Dartmouth, the only research university located on the SouthCoast of Massachusetts. The region has many options for city, town, and country living, as well as easy access to art, music, and cultural institutions in cities such as Providence, Boston, and New York. New England is home to amazing outdoor recreation, from hiking to skiing to enjoying the beaches on nearby Cape Cod. Recently the subject of an award-winning renovation, the library is the campus hub, providing space for research and study and serving as a social gathering place. Our library staff are active in our campus community, participating in events, committees, and faculty governance. The Information Services team is made up of reference and instruction liaison librarians. We work independently within our disciplines, and collaboratively in initiatives such as our first year English embedded instruction program. We value collegiality and enthusiasm, and are committed to making a positive impact in our students’ lives.

Claire T. Carney Library End of Semester Announcement

The Claire T. Carney Library will open its doors to the UMassD community for 24/7 hours starting at noon on April 22 (Sunday) until May 9 (Wednesday) when we will close at 10PM.  Library services for Circulation/Reserves and Reference will not have extended hours, so make sure to visit those service points during regular hours.  You will also need a UMass Pass to enter the building after 10PM and until regular opening hours the next day.

We hope you will find a variety of study spaces to choose from including our quiet study areas in the South Reading Room and Grand Reading Room (when no events are scheduled), several group study rooms available by reservation, and many individual and group study areas throughout the building.  Also, check our computer labs (128, 225 and 226) for extra seating during peak hours. 

Please be mindful that we will be close to seating capacity, so if you are at a group table and not expecting team members, please use our Open/Taken table tents to offer seats to others.

We also encourage everyone to be respectful of the space and other students by watching noise levels and picking up after yourselves should you bring any food/drink.

If you have any questions, please contact our staff either at the Circulation/Reserve desk (x8750), the Learning Commons desk (x8884), or the overnight security staff.

We wish you all the best with your exams and a productive end to the semester!  

SciFi Book Club to discuss “Sleeping Giants by Sylvain Neuvel”

The Science Fiction Book Club has selected Sleeping Giants by Sylvain Neuvel as the last book of the semester. Leaning more to the hard science fiction side of the genre, the novel follows Rose’s accidental discovery and life-long study of a strange relic found partially buried in South Dakota. With a unique delivery method— a mixture of fictional primary sources, interviews, and journal entries—we think this will be an entertaining read, and a great introduction to the genre for new sci fi readers.

While its partial use of diary entries to deliver the story is like The Martian by Andy Weir (our November book!), the similarities don’t end there. Neuvel also self-published the book and managed to sell the movie rights before the book was even released by a publisher. Its script is currently being written by Jurassic Park screenwriter David Koepp.

Unlike The Martian, Sleeping Giants is the first book in a series. It and its sequel, Waking Gods, have both been included in a variety of shortlists and longlists and been nominated for awards. The third book, Only Human, will be released on May 1st.

You can find it (and its sequel) at your local public library or through interlibrary loan.

Come join us on Thursday, April 26th at 2pm in Library 240 to discuss Sleeping Giants!

SciFi Book Club to discuss “Lovecraft Country”

Cover of the book Lovecraft CountryThe Science Fiction Book Club’s pick for March is Lovecraft Country by Matt Ruff. Set in the Jim Crow era, this road trip takes Atticus Turner from Chicago to New England and back again. Blending historical fiction with supernatural horror in a local setting, this title will provide a riveting discussion.

You don’t have to read any of the works by H.P. Lovecraft (native of Providence) to enjoy Lovecraft Country, but it’s hard to ignore the influences of his work on the book on many different levels. Not gaining popularity until after his death, Lovecraft’s work now defines a genre of “weird” horror which is undoubtedly present (not just by name) in Lovecraft Country. As its being discovered more explicitly through his personal letters, Lovecraft was “a virulent racist” and race plays a huge role in the book as well.

Lovecraft Country has caught the attention of HBO and its being produced by a slew of big name folks like (recent Oscar winner) Jordan Peele and J.J. Abrams. Read it with us now so you can be ahead of the popularity curve!

You can find Lovecraft Country at your public library or by requesting it through interlibrary loan.

We look forward to discussing Lovecraft Country with you in LIB 314 at 12:30pm on Thursday, March 22nd.

 

SciFi Book Club to discuss “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?”

The Science Fiction Book Club has selected Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick as their first read of the Spring semester. The book takes place in 2021, years after the war to end all wars has made Earth practically uninhabitable and most people have moved to Mars. To encourage people to move, each person gets their very own human-like android, but some androids are escaping back to Earth. The main character, Rick, hunts down these rogue androids in the hopes of getting enough money for a real animal, which is now a serious status symbol.

If this plot seems slightly familiar, perhaps you’re thinking of the 1982 movie Blade Runner (or the recent sequel Blade Runner 2049) that’s based on this book! Not only is the title different, but the book and movie are quite different, too, so you won’t spoil too much by watching the movie first.

Many of Philip K. Dick’s works have been adapted to the screen, such as Minority Report, We Can Remember it for you Wholesale (as Total Recall in 1990 and 2012), and The Man in the High Castle (the book club read this one 2 years ago!). There’s also a graphic novel adaptation of Do Androids Dream… for those of you who enjoy sequential art.

To find Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? check at your public library or request the book from our library via interlibrary loan.

We look forward to seeing you on Wednesday, February 21st at 1pm in Library 314 to discuss Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?