Category Archives: General Library

SciFi Book Club to discuss The Martian

The Science Fiction Book Club has selected Andy Weir’s The Martian as our final book for the Fall semester. The Martian tells the tale of an astronaut accidently left on Mars and how he attempts to survive. While the book is very science-heavy, it’s readable by folks who didn’t major in any of the hard sciences.

The book was originally published in 2011 on Weir’s blog and became immensely popular. After readers requested it to be available in eBook format, Weir self-published it on Amazon’s Kindle Store and soon found his book on the best seller list. Weir was initially contacted by a small audio-book publisher and by Random House shortly after. The book was released in print in 2014 but for almost a year prior it was only available as an audio-book. Read more about the publishing process on NPR.

Within weeks of securing the book deal with Random House, Weir also had a movie contract in his hands. The movie, directed by Ridley Scott and starring Matt Damon, was released in 2015. It was nominated for several Academy Awards and won two Golden Globes: Best Motion Picture-Musical or Comedy and Best Actor.

Weir’s new book, Artemis, is about a high stakes heist taking place on the moon. It’ll be released on November 14th. Perhaps this will be a future book club read!

To find The Martian, look at your public library or request the book from interlibrary loan.

We look forward to seeing you on Thursday, November 30th from 12:30-1:30pm in LIB-314 to discuss The Martian.

SciFi Book Club to discuss A Night in the Lonesome October

The SciFi Book Club is reading A Night in the Lonesome October by Roger Zelazny for our October meeting. Nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1994, this was the author’s final work before his death in 1995. Zelanzy, author of poetry and prose, has an impressive bibliography for his short 58 years. He’s been cited as an influence of several important contemporary authors such as Neil Gaiman and George R.R. Martin.

Taking place from the perspective of a dog, the reader is introduced to familiar and not so familiar characters (with their animal familiars) as some try to open a portal to let the Elder Gods in to Earth and others try to keep the portal closed. Let’s just say if you’re a fan of H.P. Lovecraft, you should read this. With each chapter (plus an introduction) representing one day of October and a storyline that mixes the supernatural with horror and humor, we felt this was a fitting choice for October.

The book also includes illustrations by Gahan Wilson, a celebrated cartoonist known for his dark humor. You can find a sample of some of his work on his official website.

The Claire T. Carney Library has one copy of this book on 7 day reserve (and many of Zelazny’s other books), but you can also look at your public library or use our interlibrary loan service to get your hands on this one.

We look forward to seeing you at our meeting on Tuesday, October 31st at 2pm in Library 314. Halloween costumes are welcome!

Banned Books Week – Celebrating the Freedom to Read

Banned Books Week is an annual awareness campaign promoted by the American Library Association and Amnesty International, to be held the week of September 24th in 2017. It celebrates the freedom to read, draws attention to banned and challenged books, and highlights persecuted individuals.

Every year the coalition of organizations that sponsors Banned Books Week has featured specific categories of banned and challenged books. This year’s celebration will emphasize the importance of the First Amendment, which guarantees our inherent right to read, naming the theme “Our Right to Read.”

The library is displaying selected banned books on the 1st floor near the Circulation Desk.  So, exercise your First Amendment right by checking out a banned book and reading it!

Introducing our Newest Librarian, Olivia Miller

A new librarian started at Claire T. Carney Library on May 1st! Read through the interview below to get to know our new Arts & Humanities Librarian, Olivia Miller.

So you’re the Arts & Humanities Librarian? What does that even mean? I function as a liaison to all students, faculty, and staff in the College of Visual and Performing Arts and the departments of Philosophy and English Literature and Criticism. That means I answer questions, buy books, teach library instruction sessions, and do one-on-one research consultations all for these departments. I also spend time on the Reference Desk in the Learning Commons each week so I answer questions for lots of different departments as much as I can.

Where are you from? I grew up in the foothills of North Carolina so I say things like “y’all.” More recently I lived in Greensboro, NC where I worked as the Public Services Librarian at Greensboro College.

Hmm. Greensboro. That sounds familiar. Is it historically important? I’m so glad you asked! Greensboro played an important role in the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. Four African American college students from North Carolina A&T asked to be served at the lunch counter at Woolworth’s. They were refused service because of their race so they refused to leave and jumpstarted a nationwide sit-in movement.

Where did you go to school and what did you major in? My undergraduate degree is from the University of North Carolina-Greensboro where I double majored in Art History and English and minored in Classics. I also have a master’s degree in Library Science from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. In grad school I mostly focused on art librarianship so I could continue to use the skills I learned as an undergrad in my professional career.

Do you have any hobbies that aren’t librarian-ish? It’s a stereotype that librarians read a lot and I adhere to that stereotype. I think I read around 80 books last year (a lot were comics but they’re still books!). I love to travel and have made a promise to myself to travel somewhere within the US and somewhere out of the country once a year (the photo above is from August with me squinting in the Icelandic sun in front of a geyser that’s preparing to do its geyser thing). I also practice yoga as much as I can.

What are you looking forward to this Fall semester? I’m excited about meeting and getting to know the students, faculty, and staff in my departments.

If you had to give one piece of advice to students, what would it be? Don’t be afraid to ask for help.

How can someone contact you if they need help with research? You can email, call, or stop by my office. You can find my contact info here.

Writer’s Guide to Government Information – A New Library Blog

Attention Aspiring (and Accomplished) Writers! We want to let you know about a new library blog, one that is unique and managed by our Undergraduate and User Services Librarian, Kari Mofford. It is called the “Writer’s Guide to Government Information Sources to Inject Real Life Detail into Your Fiction.” Here’s Kari’s description:

“I recently became the new owner/author of the blog, “Writer’s Guide to Government Information Sources to Inject Real Life Detail into Your Fiction.” Over the summer I’ve been editing, link checking, and reading through all the posts to better understand the original author’s vision. Daniel Cornwall, previously a Government Document Librarian, created an amazing reference work in blog format for assisting fiction writers/editors with fact checking and adding realism to stories. His idea was to only use Government web sites, which is very interesting. Not being a Gov. Docs. Librarian, I am learning so much about these resources and how useful they are! After my initial work, I will be adding entries and working on some larger organization/metadata issues.

I loved this blog from first read…as an avid fiction reader, I agree, nothing takes you out of a story faster than facts that are not even close.

That said, I would love to have your feedback and if you have classes or students with creative writing projects, I would enjoy their perspective of what would be helpful for future posts and topics.

While this is made for writers, everyone can enjoy reading this and It serves as a wonderful reference work. “

Here are some posts:

Questions/Comments/Feedback? Please contact Kari at:

Welcome Transfer Students – Learn About Library Resources and Services

The Claire T. Carney Library welcomes you and offers you an opportunity to meet your subject librarian.

We will review the best resources for your discipline and how to look up and find books and journal articles. We’ll tell you about the services our library offers and how to ask for help when you need it.

Did you know that you can reserve a study room to work on a project with your classmates?  How about borrowing a laptop to take to class for that presentation? Yes, the Library can help you with these.

To schedule a personal or small group appointment to learn about library services and resources,

Contact Liz Winiarz at 

Join the Science Fiction Book Club to discuss Lumberjanes Volume 1

The Science Fiction Book Club is excited to discuss Lumberjanes Volume 1: Beware the Kitten Holy at our first meeting of the fall semester. Lumberjanes is an award winning comic series, having won Eisner awards for both Best New Series and Best Publication for Teens in 2015.  The series was also nominated for a GLAAD Media Award for Outstanding Comic Book.

Lumberjanes is about the group of young teens that occupy the Roanoke cabin at Miss Qiunzella Thiskwin Penniquiqul Thistle Crumpet’s Camp for Hardcore Lady Types and the strange things they keep running into in the woods. Fans of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Adventure Time will enjoy this, but it’s a fun read for anyone who likes supernatural adventure with a little bit of silliness and lady-type power.

The first four issues of Lumberjanes are collected in this volume. For those unfamiliar with the world of comics, many are released as issues periodically at your local comic shop or through online services like ComiXology. Each issue is usually around 30 pages. If the series is successful the publisher will collect them in a volume such as this one. The most popular series’ get collected into even bigger volumes (Lumberjanes currently has three!) which may include anywhere between eight to eighteen issues per volume.

As with many comic series’, lots of different people work together to produce the final work you see in the comic shop, bookstore, or library. The series was created by Shannon Watters, Grace Ellis, and Noelle Stevenson. This volume is written by Noelle Stevenson and Grace Ellis, illustrated by Brooke A. Allen, colors by Maarta Laiho, and letters by Aubrey Aiese.

You can find Lumberjanes Volume 1 at your local public library, through interlibrary loan, on Hoopla via the Boston Public Library ecard, or through a free trial of ComiXology Unlimited or Kindle Unlimited.

We look forward to discussing this fun supernatural comic with you on Wednesday, September 27th at 1pm in Library 314.