Category Archives: Learning Commons/Scholarly Commons

JA Titan Business Challenge @ the CTC Library

Titan Challenge 2016On Thursday, March 16th, the Claire T. Carney Library will host area high school students competing in the Junior Achievement Titan Business Challenge. The challenge is “a day-long business strategy competition in which students compete against other high schools in teams of three using an online business simulation.” The teams are supported by volunteer Business Mentors who help guide and teach the students.

Good luck to all participants!!

Welcome back! We hope you had a great break. Stop by the Carney Library, we’ve got few things for you to check out (and to remind you of!)

Welcome Back! Arnie Greets Returning Students in Library Learning CommonsWelcome back for the spring semester! We hope you had a great break.

So now that you’re back we thought we’d remind you about a few things.

The library is back to regular hours starting on Monday, but if you’re unsure you can always check our library calendar to see our hours for each day.

There are lots of study spaces throughout the library for individual and group study and we’ve added more movable white boards to help you work things out. Of course on the first and second floors, there are the Learning Commons and Scholarly Commons complete with computers and printing facilities. And near the Learning Commons on the first floor there is a large quiet study space in the South Reading Room.

Need a laptop for your work in the library? Check one out at the first floor Circulation Desk. Want to schedulae a place for your group to study, then go online and reserve the room!  Or perhaps wish to just notify a friend about where you’re going to be studying in the library. Then send them a link with a pointer on a library floor map of where you’ll be using the Find Me Here tool.

If your back and already thinking about your senior project, your master’s thesis or the big paper you’ll have to write this semester, you might want to look up one of our expert subject librarians to help you with your research.

Wait, you’re back, but your an online student. Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered with our Library Services for Online Learners guide. And look here later for a schedule of library services online orientation sessions that are being planned for you.

On the other hand, if just finished moving back in and are looking for some stress free reading to relax with, check-out our New Books Shelf just across from the Circulation Desk on the first floor or pop over into the Library Living Room and see what’s there for you on the Books to Go @ The Carney Library shelves.

Anyway, we hope you get the point. We’re glad you’re back and we hope that you’ll stop by at one of our service points and ask if there is some way we can be of help … or if you want, just to say Hi!

Welcome Back!

Carney Library Staff

Celebration of Undergraduate Research 2013 – Three Minute Thesis Competition – Claire T. Carney Library – Thursday, April 25th 12-4 pm

Come watch the Three Minute Thesis Competition, a Celebration of Undergraduate Research, in the Grand Reading Room at the UMassD Claire T. Carney Library, Thursday, April 25th from 12:00 to 4:00 pm.

Competition Prizes:

  • 1st Place $1,000
  • 2nd Place $ 500
  • 3rd Place $ 250
  • Audience favorite $ 250

All entries were examined by a pre-selection panel, and only those selected by that panel are participating in the competition.

The criteria used by the pre-selection panel were:

  • Clarity of expression of the research abstract and the problem addressed.
  • The importance of the research.
  • The broader impact of the research.
  • Future directions for research.

The 3-minute competition will be carried out under the following rules:

  • All entrants have 3 minutes to present their research topic to an audience and a panel of judges.
  • Each entrant may have one, and only one, still overhead.
  • With 10 seconds to go, entrants will receive a signal. At 3 minutes, entrants will get the sign to stop and anyone not finishing within 10 seconds after 3 minutes will be disqualified.
  • The judges’ decision is final.

Sponsored by the UMassD Office of Undergraduate Research.

The Writing and Reading Center Branches Out!

For the second semester, writing tutors from the ARC Writing and Reading Center will be available to help students with writing assignments.

Peer tutors are trained to help students in all areas of writing from English 100 essays to seminar papers and everything in between.  Any subject, any audience, any format.

Tutors are also trained to help at any stage of the writing process: from understanding an assignment and brainstorming topics to citations and final drafts.

Peer tutors will be free to meet with students one-on-one, Sunday through Wednesday evenings in the Learning Commons (see the details below).

Sunday through Wednesday 7 pm to 10 pm

Appointments are recommended.

To make an appointment call the Learning Commons Help Desk at 508-999-8884

Or you can stop by either

  • the Learning Commons Help Desk in the Claire T.Carney Library

or

  • the Writing and Reading Center in LARTs 220A.

Learning Commons to open at UMass Dartmouth

Opening on the first day of the new semester, the Learning Commons at the Claire T. Carney Library integrates library, technology, and academic support services for UMass Dartmouth students, faculty, and staff.

The Learning Commons, or LC, is a cross-campus collaborative effort. It will be administered by the Division of Library Services, Information Resources and Technology with a campus-wide advisory group. They will ensure that the LC continually develops to meet the ever-changing needs of teaching, learning, and scholarship in a technology-rich environment.

The first-floor LC is a comfortable place designed for undergraduates to study, write papers, prepare presentations for class, collaborate with groups, do library research, and get help with technology. The LC offers 39 computer work stations, a scanning station, and a print center.

The welcoming, helpful staff at the LC Service Desk can assist with a wide variety of questions, from library and reference resources to technology services, such as COIN, email, and support for software applications. Students can also meet with tutors from the Writing & Reading Center in the evenings for help with writing papers. As the LC develops, additional academic support services will be available at this convenient location.

Faculty and students who are engaged in more advanced research will want to visit the Scholarly Commons on the second floor. Reference librarians there provide expert assistance and instruction in the identification, evaluation, and use of information resources. The Center for Teaching Excellence—also part of the Scholarly Commons—promotes teaching practices that enhance student learning.
The LC Training and Computer Classrooms on the lower level of the library offer two computer classrooms that are also available for campus-wide training and professional development.

The LC is open during regular library hours, with additional 24×7 access during the last three weeks of classes and exam periods. The lower-level computer classrooms will also be available for student use during peak study times.

The “learning commons” or “information commons” concept has gained momentum on campuses over the past two decades. Many colleges and universities have established them to provide technology-rich, integrated support for learning.

“The opening of the Learning Commons at UMass Dartmouth represents a major step in our ongoing mission to provide integrated library, technology, and academic support services for our students, faculty, and staff,” said Robert Green, vice chancellor for Library Services, Information Resources and Technology.

“As the university plans for the expansion and renovation of the Claire T. Carney Library, the introduction of the Learning Commons allows us to gain expertise in the provision of innovative services to meet the 21st-century learning needs of our students.”

For more information about the Learning Commons, please visit: www.umassd.edu/lc/

DRAFT for review Learning Commons Mission

DRAFT for review Learning Commons Mission

In support of UMass Dartmouth’s academic mission, the Learning Commons creates and cultivates a vibrant, welcoming and integrated learner-centered environment.

We will do so by promoting an environment and support team that

  • inspires learners and fosters learning as an activity
  • embodies and supports engagement & collaboration for individual & group work
  • champions and supports the research process from search and discovery to synthesis and presentation.
  • provides easily accessible and adaptable physical spaces and resources
  • excels at providing rich technological facilities, instruction, and support
  • maximizes individual and group productivity by integrating scholarly information support services and information literacy instruction

Learning Commons – Committee Charge

The UMass Dartmouth Learning Commons (LC) Planning Committee will develop plans for the services, technology, resources, and space for the LC on the first and second floors of the Claire T. Carney Library. The LC will be an interdisciplinary collaborative learning space that will provide seamless access to resources, technology, and people to support teaching, learning, and research. The LC will advance the University mission to be “actively engaged in personalized teaching and innovative research” and will help to fulfill the University’s vision of “providing a personalized academic environment where the scholarly research and creative activities of faculty and graduate students are interwoven with the undergraduate experience.” It will also advance the vision of providing “enhanced technological capabilities for the delivery of our educational and outreach programs.” As an integrated environment that fosters engagement, collaboration, and discovery, the LC will meet the changing and emerging needs of teaching, learning, and scholarship at UMass Dartmouth.

The Committee will consider the following questions:

  • What are the learning styles and preferences of today’s high school and college students and faculty?
  • What type of environment will foster learning at UMass Dartmouth, given changing learning styles and preferences?
  • What staffing, technology, and space are necessary to create this environment?
  • What LC programs would foster this environment?
  • Should the scope of the LC include faculty and staff learning?
  • Which campus units might be involved, and how might they work together?
  • Is it necessary for these campus units to be physically located in the same space to be effective together?
  • What kinds of hardware, software, and seating configurations are needed?
  • What staffing is needed in terms of qualification, and abilities?
  • What are the issues in accomplishing the ideal LC environment for UMass Dartmouth?
  • How can these issues be resolved?
  • How should we measure the LC’s success?

Dr. D. Russell Bailey Leads a Day of Discussion on “The Evolving Commons Concept”

Dr. D. Russell Bailey gave a public presentation entitled “The Evolving Commons Concept: Information, Teaching, Learning, Research” and met with several task groups who are working on developing a Learning Commons in the Claire T. Carney Library at UMass Dartmouth.

The presentation focused on the history and variety of philosophies and components of Information and Learning Commons and how they are evolving. He emphasized that the Commons model is an organizing principle focused on meeting patrons needs which also serves as a framework for working with campus partners in developing a “seamlessly integrated (from the patron’s perspective) continuum of services, tools, systems and resources, in-facility and on the Web”.

Dr. D. Russell Bailey is a leader in the area of Information Commons. He is the Director of the Phillips Memorial Library at Providence College. He is co-author of the new book: Transforming Library Service through Information Commons: Case Studies for the Digital Age (American Library Association, 2008) and a contributing author to the Information Commons Handbook (Neal-Schuman Publishers 2006). He is co-author of the article, “Information Commons Redux: Concept, Evolution and Transcending the Tragedy of the Commons,” in the Journal of Academic Librarianship (2002). He has given numerous presentations on Learning Commons, most recently, in Hong Kong.

For further information on Dr. Bailey and his work, please see his faculty profile at Providence College.

More than 800 votes cast in “chair fair”

More than 800 votes, both online and on paper ballots, were cast in our Learning Commons “Chair Fair,” which ended on September 29. We received lots of thoughtful and helpful comments as well. We’re tallying the results and will report back soon with details about the winning chairs. Thanks for your participation!

For more information about the Learning Commons, please visit the site.