Category Archives: Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives

Hybrid Identity and the Portuguese-American Experience in the Novels of Alfred Lewis – A lecture by Prof. Frank F. Sousa – 5 P.M., May 10, 2012

What: A lecture by  Prof. Frank F. Sousa entitled: “Hybrid Identity and the Portuguese-American Experience in the Novels of Alfred Lewis”
Where: Prince Henry Society Reading Room at the Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives, Claire T. Carney Library
When: May 10th, 2012, 5:00 P.M.

~ Free and open to the public ~ Light refreshments will be served ~

The Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives and the Center for Portuguese Studies and Culture at the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth announce a lecture, “Hybrid Identity and the Portuguese-American Experience in the Novels of Alfred Lewis,” by Prof. Frank F. Sousa, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, on Thursday, May 10 at 5:00 P.M. in the Prince Henry Society Reading Room at the Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives (Parking lot 13). The lecture, free and open to the public, will include the launching of Lewis’s novel Home Is an Island. Light refreshments will be served.

Alfred Lewis (1902-1977) is the author of two published novels: Home Is an Island (Random House, 1951; Tagus Press, 2012) and Sixty Acres and a Barn (Tagus Press, 2005 and 1912). This lecture examines how these two works of fiction complement each other—the first treats life in the Old Country (Azores, Portugal) in the first quarter of the twentieth century, through the story of a young man who is about to emigrate to the America of his dreams, while the second is set in America, where the main character, a recent immigrant, pursues the American Dream on a dairy farm in the Central Valley of California during the 1940s. Both works call attention to the balancing act of dual identities and divided loyalties in individuals and communities on the margins between cultures. No other writer captures so well how the poor in the Azores viewed the promise of America and how Portuguese immigrants made a new life for themselves.

Alfred Lewis, born Alfredo Luís in the mid-Atlantic island of Flores, in the archipelago of the Azores, Portugal, was the son of a nineteenth-century whaleman who sailed the seven seas and eventually became a gold prospector in California, before returning to his homeland. Lewis himself immigrated to the Central Valley (Atwater) in 1922. Having learned English only after arriving in America, he nevertheless went on to study law and become a municipal judge in the San Joaquin Valley town of Los Baños.

Prof. Sousa’s lecture will conclude with the launching of a new, hardbound edition of Alfred Lewis’s classic novel, Home Is an Island, originally published by the prestigious Random House Publishers in 1951. The novel received much critical acclaim, including two reviews in the New York Times, and was highly praised by the well-known American novelist Patricia Highsmith, who wrote, “One does not often find a novel that reads like a poem, that tells a simple story in a simple prose, and yet is heroic, a novel of importance.”

Home Is an Island is volume 17 of the Portuguese in the Americas Series published by Tagus Press at UMass Dartmouth, in partnership with the University Press of New England. The Tagus Press cloth edition, sponsored by the Luso-American Foundation, features a foreword by Congressman Devin Nunes and a preface by Frank F. Sousa.

Frank F. Sousa is professor of Portuguese and director of both the Center for Portuguese Studies and Culture and Tagus Press at the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth. He is the author of O segredo de Eça, an often-cited work on Portugal’s foremost novelist of the nineteenth century.

Directions: The entrance to the Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives is located on the campus side of the Claire T. Carney Library. For access during library construction, as you approach from Lot 13, enter the library basement and take the elevator to the first floor, exit the building, and proceed to the right, to the Archives entrance.

For further information, contact 508-999-8686 or email jfarrar@umassd.edu.

Azorean Immigration to the United States Through the Documents of One Family – A presentation by Michael Hall, deputy chief genealogical officer of FamilySearch – UMass Dartmouth Library – Thursday, April 12th, 6 PM

Antonio Brilhante FamilyWhat: Presentation by Michael Hall, deputy chief genealogical officer of FamilySearch on the Azorean Immigration to the United States Through the Documents of One Family
Where: Prince Henry Society Reading Room at the Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives, Claire T. Carney Library, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth (Park in Lot 13)
When: Thursday, April 12 at 6:00 P.M.

~ Free and open to the public ~ Light refreshments will be served ~

On Campus Directions: For access during library construction as you approach from Lot 13, enter the library basement and take the elevator to the first floor, exit the building, and proceed to the right to the Archives entrance. 

Azorean Immigration to the United States Through the Documents of One Family

The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives announces a presentation by Michael Hall, deputy chief genealogical officer of FamilySearch The event—free and open to the public—will take place on Thursday, April 12 at 6:00 P.M. in the Prince Henry Society Reading Room at the Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives (Parking lot 13). Light refreshments will be served.

Titled “Immigration of Azoreans to the United States through the Documents of one Family,” the presentation will follow the journey of the Brilhante Family from the village of Relva, in São Miguel, Azores to Fall River, Massachusetts. The story will be told through the documents and eyes of Antonio Brilhante.  The history of Azorean immigration to the U.S. will unfold through the use of various governmental, ecclesiastical, and private documents that were created both in the Azores and the United States. This presentation will demonstrate how to use documents to recreate the history of a particular family or an ethnic group, but also the importance of preserving all documents for the use of the family historian and other researchers.  Selected family photos and newspaper articles will be interspersed throughout the presentation to give a feel of the life and experience of the Brilhante Family while illustrating common patterns of Azorean immigration to the U.S.

Michael J. Hall is the Deputy Chief Genealogical Officer of FamilySearch, the largest genealogical organization in the world, headquartered in Salt Lake City, UT, where he works with libraries and genealogical societies worldwide. He has a degree in Anthropology from Brigham Young University and his areas research include the Azores, from which his maternal ancestors immigrated to the United States, and the upper mid-west region of the United States. He is a member of the Genealogy and Local History Committee of the American Library Association, and will be its 2013 incoming chair. He also serves in a similar capacity on the International Federation of Libraries and Associations (IFLA). He has written various genealogical guides for the Family History Library (FHL) in Salt Lake City.

The entrance to the Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives is located on the campus side of the Claire T. Carney Library. For access during library construction as you approach from Lot 13, enter the library basement and take the elevator to the first floor, exit the building, and proceed to the right to the Archives entrance.

For further information, contact 508-999-8695 or email spacheco@umassd.edu.

Legality, Literacy, and Belonging among Azoreans and Brazilians in Massachusetts – a talk by Dr. Kate Vieira of the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

What: Legality, Literacy, and Belonging among Azoreans and Brazilians in Massachusetts –  a talk by Dr. Kate Vieira of the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
When:  Thursday, March 15 at 8:00 A.M.
Where:  UMass Dartmouth, Liberal Arts Building – Room 101

~ The event—free and open to the public ~

Dr. Kate Vieira’s talk is being presented by the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives

Based on ethnographic work conducted in a Massachusetts community, the talk addresses issues of ethnic identity among Portuguese-speakers, examining how concepts of literacy and legality regulate the lives of Azoreans and Brazilians.

“On one hand,” states Dr. Vieira, “Azoreans needed to be literate in order to migrate to the U.S. On the other hand, literacy was systematically withheld from Azoreans in line with local labor needs. How, then, is literacy tied up with national identity for Azoreans, especially in a U.S. context in which factory work often won out over school? “

Dr. Vieira’s talk will ask us to rethink common assumptions about the relationship between literacy, legality and immigrant integration, arguing that rather than promoting upward social mobility, literacy and legality are primarily used to regulate the lives of immigrants, including those of Massachusetts’ newest group of Portuguese-speakers, Brazilians, who are often viewed as more educated than Azoreans, but less legal.

Dr. Kate Vieira is assistant professor of English and Writing Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her work on migration and literacy has appeared in College English and Written Communication. She recently won the International John R. Hayes Award for Excellence in Writing Research.  Dr. Vieira is currently working on a monograph about literacy, legality, and belonging among Azoreans and Brazilians in a community in Massachusetts. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

For further information,contact Sonia Pacheco at  508-999-8684 or email her at spacheco@umassd.edu.


Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives and University Archives and Special Collections to Close for the Holidays

Christmas Greeting Image from early campus Torch  NewspaperThe Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives and the University’s Archives and Special Collections, located in the Claire T. Carney Library, will be closed for the holidays. Closure will begin on December 23rd at 4:00 pm and continue through January 2nd. The Archives will reopen with regular hours January 3rd. The current exhibition on display in the gallery, with selections from the Schooner Ernestina/Effie M. Morrissey Archives, will continue through March 2012.

Information & graphic from University Archives & Special Collections Blog post: http://archivesblog.lib.umassd.edu/?p=430

Father Alfredo Viera de Freitas’ View of America in 1939 – April 21st – UMass Dartmouth

What: A talk by historian Duarte Barcelos Mendonça entitled “Father Alfredo Vieira de Freitas’ View of America in 1939.”
Where:  Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives, UMass Dartmouth Libary
When: Thursday, April 21, 6:00 – 7:30 P.M.

~ free and open to the public – A cocktail reception will follow. ~

In 1939, just before the beginning of World War II, Father Vieira, a young
Madeiran priest, professor, journalist and poet, visited the United States
for the first time. During his two-month stay in America, Father Vieira
traveled extensively throughout the East Coast, visiting several cities and
places. Apart from the Whaling City, he visited Cape Cod, Providence,
Newport, New York City and the Niagara Falls, to name but a few of his
destinations. Upon his return to Madeira, he published a series of 71
chronicles about his trip in a local newspaper. This talk, accompanied by a
PowerPoint presentation, focuses on the main aspects of his chronicles,
which were published as an annotated anthology by Duarte Mendonça, in 2009.

Presented by The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Ferreira-Mendes
Portuguese-American Archives, the Center for Portuguese Studies and Culture
and the Museum of Madeiran Heritage.

The entrance to the Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives is located on the campus side of the Claire T. Carney Library. For access during library construction as you approach from Lot 13, enter the library basement and proceed to the first floor, exit the building, and proceed to the right to the Archives entrance.

For further information, contact Sonia Pacheco at 508-999-8684 or spacheco@umassd.edu.

 

PhotoGraphics Department Relocated into Archives Area During Library Renovation Project

The UMassD Library’s PhotoGraphics Department has been relocated from the Library lower level to a temporary location within the Archives & Special Collections/Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese American Archives of the Claire T. Carney Library. Hours of operation remain 8:00 – 5:00, with access through the Archives only from 9:30 – 5:00. To access the department prior to 9:30am, please call ahead of time.

Note: As a result of the move, Photographics has had to temporarily downsize their operation and some services will be limited. Please contact us if you have any questions or concerns or email DConfar@umassd.edu.

  • x8693 D. Confar
  • x8762 Heather Tripp
  • x8694 Justin Maucione
  • x6573 Jennifer White

PhotoGraphics will reside within the Archives area until the Claire T. Carney Library renovation is completed. Enter Archives from the entrance facing the center of the campus. See the PhotoGraphics departments new location on a library building floor plan.

 

Dr. João Leal speaks on the “Imperadores and Queens: Travels of a Ritual across the North Atlantic” and book launch of “Azorean Identity in Brazil and the United States: Arguments about History, Culture, and Transnational Connections” – March 24th, UMass Dartmouth

What: Talk by anthropologist, Dr. João Leal on the “Imperadores and Queens: Travels of a Ritual across the North Atlantic” and launch of his book: Azorean Identity in Brazil and the United States: Arguments about History, Culture, and Transnational Connections

Where: Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives, Claire T. Carney Library, UMass Dartmouth

When: 6:00 – 7:30 pm, March 24, 2011

Light refreshments will be served.

Please join us for the launch of Azorean Identity in Brazil and the United States: Arguments about History, Culture, and Transnational Connections published by Tagus Press at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

At the launching, the author, anthropologist, Dr. João Leal, will deliver a talk titled “Imperadores and Queens: Travels of a Ritual across the North Atlantic” and will be on hand to sign copies of the book

Dr. João Leal is an associate professor in the Department of Anthropology at the Universidade Nova de Lisboa and a senior researcher at CRIA (Centre for Anthropological Research) in Lisbon.  Dr. Leal’s presentation at the launching of Azorean Identity in Brazil and the United States will explore the importance of transnational links between Azorean communities in the Azores and the USA in the maintenance and transformation of the Holy Ghost festas. Based on two case studies carried out in the islands of Pico and Santa Maria, he will show how the innovations introduced into the Holy Ghost festas in the U.S. have transformed these rituals in their place of origin–the Azores.

The Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives are a joint collaboration between the Center for Portuguese Studies and Culture and the Claire T. Carney Library.

The entrance to the Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives is located on the campus side of the Claire T. Carney Library.  For access during library construction as you approach from Lot 13, enter the library basement and proceed to the first floor, exit the building, and proceed to the right to the Archives entrance.

For further information, contact 508-999-8684 or email spacheco@umassd.edu.

 

 

Portuguese-Canadian Academic Underachievement and Parental Approaches Towards their Children’s Schooling” a lecture by Dr. Fernando Nunes – Nov. 18th – Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives

What: Portuguese-Canadian Academic Underachievement and Parental Approaches Towards their Children’s Schooling” a lecture by Dr. Fernando Nunes, Assistant Professor in the Department of Child and Youth Study at Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Where: Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives located in the Claire T. Carney Library

When: Thursday, November 18 from 12:30 to 1:30 P.M.

The event is free and open to the public.

Based on a national, community-based study that was undertaken to uncover the barriers and support mechanisms influencing retention and academic achievement in Canada, the lecture will report the research’s preliminary findings for Portuguese-Canadian students and describe the common roles, approaches and responses of the parents of these youth to their children’s education. Dr. Nunes will also address the implications of the findings for current theory and policy, including anti-racism education, caste theory and the policy of Employment Equity.

The event will take place on Thursday, November 18 from 12:30 to 1:30 P.M. in the Prince Henry Society Reading Room of the Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives located in the Claire T. Carney Library.

Dr. Fernando Nunes holds a Ph.D. in the area of education and community development, and a M.Ed. in applied psychology, from the Multicultural Focus of OISE/UT, (the Ontario Institute of Studies in Education of the University of Toronto). He has conducted research on at-risk immigrant youth, the academic underachievement of Portuguese-Canadian children, Portuguese-Canadian immigrant women, and the Lusophone Diaspora; coordinated the first national study on the Portuguese in Canada, “Portuguese-Canadians: From Sea to Sea;” wrote the first monograph on the adaptation of the Portuguese in Canada– Problems and Adjustments of the Portuguese Immigrant Family in Canada;  and authored several research articles and reports on Portuguese Canadians.

Prior to his current position at Mount Saint Vincent University, he taught at OISE/UT, Brock, York and Ryerson Universities. He is affiliated with CERIS-Toronto (The Joint Centre of Excellence for Research on Immigration and Settlement), and The Atlantic Metropolis Centre.

Dr. Nunes has also served as a board member of various community organizations, such as the Portuguese-Canadian National Congress, the Portuguese Interagency Network, Canadian National Institute for the Blind-Toronto and the Toronto Community Care Access Centre.  In the early 1980s, he also co-founded the first student-led Luso-Canadian student association, the York University Portuguese Association.

His current research activities focus on minority academic underachievement, the civic and political participation of Portuguese-Canadian youth, and the effectiveness of Canada’s model of immigration settlement services.  His most recent project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, is examining the barriers and support mechanisms to the education of Luso-Canadian youth, in five Canadian cities.

Directions:

For directions to the UMass Dartmouth campus, see http://www.umassd.edu/vtour/.  Please use Parking Lot 13.

Access to the archives during library construction is by way of the library basement and first floor exit.

Exhibit and Lecture Featuring the Collection of the Late Miguel Corte-Real at UMass Dartmouth

What: Exhibit and Lecture featuring the collection of the late Miguel Corte-Real at UMass Dartmouth

Where: Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives, Claire T. Carney Library

When: Friday, October 22nd, 2010 at 6:00 PM

The event is free, open to the public and includes light refreshments.

The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth announces the opening of the exhibit “Miguel Corte-Real: the Man and his Collection” and a lecture entitled “The Côrte-Real Collection: a Personal and Intransmissible Experience,” organized by the Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives in collaboration with the Claire T. Carney Library.

The event will take place on Friday, October 22nd, 2010 at 6:00 PM, in the Prince Henry Society Reading Room of the Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives, Claire T. Carney Library.

Curated by librarian/archivist Sonia Pacheco, the exhibit features key items from the collection, such as books and archival documents.  Irene de Amaral, a PhD candidate in the Department of Portuguese at UMassD, who is using the Côrte-Real materials to research her doctoral dissertation, will speak about her experience using the collection and its importance for the field of Azorean studies in the U.S.

Born in Ponta Delgada, S. Miguel, Azores, to Luis de Figueiredo Lemos do Canto Côrte-Real and Filomena M. da Conceição, Miguel de Figueiredo Corte-Real was the youngest son in an aristocratic family.  He was raised in Santa Maria, an island which always held a special place in his heart.  In 1969, he immigrated to the United States with his wife and children and settled in New Bedford.

Unlike the majority of immigrants who arrive in the U.S. with little more than a suitcase of personal items, Miguel Corte-Real was able to bring along an extensive number of cherished family heirlooms and household items including a large number of books, manuscripts and other historical documents.  Once established in his new country, he continued to add to his existing library and archive by collecting items associated with the presence of the Portuguese in the U.S.  In 2008, he donated his personal library and archive to the Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives asking that the collection receive the name of his father Luis de Figueiredo Côrte-Real.

Miguel Corte-Real’s library was the work of a lifetime and contains rare, and sometimes difficult to find volumes.  Considered by some to be the best private collection of Açoriana outside of the Acores, it includes fictional works by Azorean authors and about the Azores; comprehensive histories of individual islands and of the archipelago; geographical and geological studies; monographs on various topics related to the Azores; and texts that document religious and cultural practices and rituals specific to the Azores. The Archival Collection includes personal correspondence; various scrapbooks; genealogical research; and Luso-American newspapers published in the last 30 years.

~     ~     ~

Parking is available in Lot # 13.

The entrance to the Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives is located on the campus side of the Claire T. Carney Library.  For access during library construction, from Lot 13, enter the library basement and proceed to the first floor, exit the building, and proceed to the right to the Archives entrance.

For further information contact 508-999-8684 or email spacheco@umassd.edu.

Reflections on migration, translocal connection, identity and soccer – September 21st – Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives

What: “Reflections on migration, translocal connection, identity and soccer: corporate/categorical forms of belonging and affective ties.”
Where:
Claire T. Carney Library – Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives
When:
Tuesday, September 21 from 12:30 to 1:30 P.M.
~  The event is free and open to the public.  ~

Soccer Team Image

The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth announces a lecture by Miguel Moniz, FCT Research Fellow at the Center for Anthropological Research in Lisbon, Portugal, organized by the Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives.

Based on research with in-migration to Portugal and with Lusophone migrant communities in New England and the UK, Dr. Moniz looks at how soccer and other affective ties create translocal links, implicating socio-political identity categories such as ethnic group and the nation.

Miguel Moniz received a PhD in anthropology from Brown University in 2004.  In addition to numerous articles, Dr. Moniz is the author of two books– Across the Atlantic: Anglo and American travel writing about the Azores and Azores (World Bibliographical Series). Currently, he is a fellow of the Fundação para Ciência e a Tecnologia (FCT) with a research position at CRIA (ISCTE/IUL), a newly formed national anthropological research group, composed of anthropology units of ISCTE/IUL, the Universidade Nova, the Catolica and the Universidade do Minho. Moniz’ current research looks at the functioning of state bureaucracies on local identities (work begun with his dissertation on Azorean deportees, written while lecturing at UMassD) and burgeoning nationalism within the European Union; as well as ethnomusicological approaches to material culture and migration. He is a researcher in Lisbon-based Diasbola, a working group on the socio-cultural role of soccer in Luso-migrant communities, with institutional links in the UK, France and Germany and research projects among migrant populations in Europe, Africa and New England.

The event  is free and open to the public.   For directions to the UMass Dartmouth campus, see http://www.umassd.edu/vtour/.  Please use Parking Lot 13.

Access to the archives during library construction is by way of the library basement and first floor exit.