Library Closed – Tuesday, August 1st

The Claire T. Carney library will be closed tomorrow, Tuesday, August 1st due to extremely high indoor air temperatures. Work continues on the AC unit. We will post further updates as soon as we receive them.

Reminder: For computer access, students may use the lab in Textile 001 and community members are invited to use the School of Law Library (located at 333 Faunce Corner Road in Dartmouth). The computer lab in Textile 001 is open weekdays from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm. For the School of Law Library — which is open 7 days/week — please check their website for hours.

Sorry for the inconvenience!

Library Closed – Monday, July 31st

We are sorry to report that work to the AC unit is ongoing and that the library will be closed today, Monday, July 31st. While repairs have been made, the unit is not yet functioning and temperatures yesterday afternoon at 2 pm were 85 to 89 degrees. The Dean of Library Services is hoping to re-open the library tomorrow, Tuesday, August 1st. As soon as a decision is made, I will post the news to this blog as well as to the library’s Facebook and Twitter accounts.

 

EMERGENCY LIBRARY CLOSING

Due to extreme heat conditions, the Claire T. Carney Library is closed.

Check the website for updates.

For computer access, students may use the lab in Textile 001 and community members are invited to use the School of Law Library (located at 333 Faunce Corner Road in Dartmouth).  The computer lab in Textile 001 is open weekdays from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm.  For the School of Law Library – which is open 7 days/week, please check their website for hours.

Net Neutrality Day

Did you know that today is Net Neutrality Day of Action?

In case you’re not familiar with net neutrality, the American Library Association  defines it as “the principle that internet service providers (ISPs) must enable access to all content and applications regardless of the source and without favoring or blocking specific services or websites.” The ALA describes the importance of net neutrality on their Network Neutrality page. There is also a brief article in CQ Researher (restricted to UMassD) that highlights some of the arguments in favor and against the current regulatory changes.

 

 

WorldCat Subscription Change

The library will be altering its OCLC WorldCat subscription beginning July 1st. This change will yield significant savings and will have minimal impact on our faculty and students. It will not affect the timing of interlibrary loan deliveries. That said, there are a couple of changes you should be aware of:

  • You will no longer have the option of submitting an interlibrary loan request directly from WorldCat. Instead, you will need to enter the citation information in ILLiad (Note: ILLiad is the name of the system we use to submit and manage interlibrary loan requests.)
  • You WILL continue to have access to WorldCat.org, but you will only see the holdings of libraries who subscribe to an OCLC product called WorldCat Discovery. A library must subscribe to WorldCat Discovery in order for its holdings to appear in the free Worldcat.org.

If you’re a frequent user of WorldCat and want to search the Discovery version, you can still do so through the Boston Public Library (BPL). The BPL offers free ecards to Massachusetts residents as well as those who “commute to a Massachusetts employer on a sustained and regular basis.” By using this free ecard, you can use Discovery to see the holdings of libraries regardless of whether they subscribe to the product. In other words, you will find holdings of institutions such as UMass Dartmouth and UMass Amherst even though these libraries don’t subscribe.

We understand that the relationship between WorldCat Discovery and WorldCat.org is confusing. If you have any questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Helpful Links:

Science Fiction Book Club Meeting – American Gods

The Science Fiction Book Club’s second meeting of the summer is less than a month away. On July 19th we’ll be discussing Neil Gaiman’s award winning 2001 novel, American Gods.

Gaiman has had a presence in almost every medium of pop culture: comics, television, film, social media, and books. Gaiman started his career as a journalist but soon fell into the world of comics where his Sandman series helped revolutionize the possibilities of comic storytelling. Shortly after starting Sandman, he began his career as a writer of novels and continued to win lots of awards. His first solo novel, Neverwhere, was first a 6-part television series, also written by him. Both versions of his tale were released in 1996. He’s written so much and in so many different mediums, it’s probably best that I just share his bibliography with you and we’ll get on to why we’re here.

American Gods was his third solo novel and won four awards in 2002*. In early 2013, a 10 year anniversary edition of the “author’s preferred text” was released with thousands of more words added by Gaiman. Just this year, the first season of a TV series was released on Starz to high praise.

Gaiman is very communicative with his fans, tweeting constantly and semi-regularly keeping up a blog. He’s serving as the executive producer for the TV series and often tweets and blogs about the show.

American Gods is available in many local public libraries, through interlibrary loan, as well as through Boston Public Library’s ecard access to Hoopla as an audiobook.

We look forward to seeing you all in Library 314 at 12pm on Wednesday, July 19th to discuss American Gods!

 

*This link has an amazing amount of extra information, like scanned copies of his written notes and references (he thinks) he used to write the book. Beware of spoilers if you haven’t finished!

The Sci Fi Book Club is reading A Wrinkle In Time!

This summer the Science Fiction Book Club will be transporting our minds to new places (but perhaps familiar to some) in three fantasy novels that have been adapted into movies or TV series.

In the first meeting of the summer, we’ll be discussing the classic children’s fantasy novel A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle. The book was released in 1962 and in 1963 it won the coveted Newbery Medal. You can read L’Engle’s acceptance speech here.

The Newbery Medal is a big deal. It’s been awarded each year since 1922 to the book a committee within the Association for Library Service to Children finds to represent the “most distinguished contribution to American literature for children” in that year.

Aside from the fact it won an important award, this book and its series, Time Quintet, is hugely popular. Like with many popular books, some deemed it necessary to ban or challenge its place in libraries and schools. According to the American Library Association it was the 22nd most banned book of the 1990s. Chances are you’ve either read it or heard about it—even if that’s only because you follow Mindy Kaling, Oprah Winfrey, or Reese Witherspoon on Instagram.

You probably weren’t expecting to see these names here, were you? In February of 2017, filming of the newest movie adaptation wrapped up in New Zealand. Kaling, Winfrey, and Witherspoon couldn’t help themselves from posting pictures of their fun on other side of the world. This Mashable article collects their best photos.

The movie, produced by Disney, is due to hit theatres March 9, 2018. This is actually the 2nd time Disney has adapted the book to the screen. They originally filmed the 2003 movie as a TV miniseries but ultimately premiered it as a TV movie and released it to DVD several months later.

This classic book should be available at your local public library or through our interlibrary loan service! For fans of comics, you can also find a graphic novel adaptation of the book!

Join us in Library 314 at noon on Tuesday, June 13th to discuss A Wrinkle in Time!

CTC Library Associates Event – Italian Lifelines

Picture of Rose Facchini, presenter of Italian LifelinesThe Claire T. Carney Library Associates announces its special program, Italian Lifelines, featuring Rose Facchini, lecturer of Italian at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth on Sunday, May 21st, 2017 in the Grand Reading Room of the Claire T. Carney Library on the UMass Dartmouth campus at 1 PM. 

The program is free and open to all.

Rose Facchini holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in history, philosophy and religious studies and a Master of Arts degree in International relations. She is currently studying Italian literature at the Middlebury Language schools for her second Master’s degree. Rose continues to expand the Italian studies program at UMass Dartmouth through the creation of three new Italian courses. Ms. Facchini will be speaking about Italian fashion through the ages and will highlight the importance of identity in Italian literature regarding its connection to the seemingly ephemeral and constantly evolving phenomenon of fashion.

This program is dedicated to Chancellor Professor Emeritus of Italian, Latin and Spanish, Giulio Massano, who passed away in April 2014. Prof. Massano was born in Sant’ Albano Stura located in the northern Piemonte region of Italy. After completing his undergraduate degree in Torino, Italy, he moved to Bogotá, Colombia where he developed a love of early Spanish literature. He received a PhD in Spanish and Italian literature of the Middle Ages, Renaissance and Baroque periods from Catholic University of America in 1973. In 1974, he became a faculty member at the then Southeastern Massachusetts University teaching Spanish and Latin. During his first year, he petitioned successfully to add Italian to the curriculum. During his 39-year career at UMass Dartmouth, Prof. Massano also served as Chairperson of the Department of Foreign Languages and Literature for 11 years

Prior to the lecture, the Claire T. Carney Library Associates will be holding a short business meeting which will include the election of officers. The CTC Library Associates will also present a check from the Library Associates to the dean of the library, Terrence Burton.

After the program, a light reception featuring Italian food and desserts will be served.

Parking is available on campus in lot 13. For further information, please contact either Rita Raymond at 508-995-3528 or Maria Sanguinetti at 508-991-5096.

Announcing New Library Journal Subscriptions

The Claire T. Carney library has added subscriptions to 18 new journals and online access is now complete. The titles and their access information is listed below:

Acta Mathematica – an open access journal – Access is available from 1882 volume: 1
BIT Numerical Mathematics – Access is available from 1997 volume: 37
British journal of Criminology – Access is available from 1996 volume: 36
Communications in Computational Physics – Access is available from 2011 volume: 9
European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing – Access is available from 2002 volume: 1
Feminist Criminology – Access is available from 2006 volume: 1
Foundations of Computational Mathematics – Access is available from 2001 volume: 1
Health Affairs – Access is available from 1981 volume: 1
History of Political Thought – Access is available from 1991 volume: 12
IMA Journal of Numerical Analysis – Access is available from 1996 volume: 16
Journal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association – Access is available from 1999 volume: 5
Journal of Immunology – Access is available from 1916 volume: 1
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies – Access is available from 2000
Journal of Phycology – Access is available from 1996 volume: 32
New York Review of Books – Access is available from 1963.
Nursing Inquiry – Access is available from 1997 volume: 4
Nursing Philosophy – Access is available from 2000 volume: 1
SIAM/ASA Journal on Uncertainty Quantification – Access is available from 2013 volume: 1